An eerie calm has settled over Condit Dam.  All of the heavy equipment and scaffolding has been removed and the barge pulled out of the lake.  The workforce has been paired down and there is almost no activity around the dam.  It appears that the JR Merit team and their crew of contractors is nearly ready for the explosive breach tomorrow at noon.  Their attention has turned to safety and crowd control, while our small media crew is in full gear preparing a complex multi-camera shoot.  For everyone involved, years of planning will come down to one explosive moment tomorrow at noon.

Let me introduce you to Larry Moran.  Tomorrow, Larry will be in a helicopter patrolling the dam site and the area of river between the dam and the Columbia.  If Larry sees anyone in the area, he will shut down the blast until a team of local police can locate and remove the person.  The man has eyes like and eagle and isn’t messing around–I’m not sure I’d want him to be mad at me.  According to Larry, the concussive force of the blast will be strong enough to make your ears bleed if you’re close enough to watch it in person.  I also certainly wouldn’t really want to be responsible for the dam breach being postponed, because I’d have to answer to a lot more folks than Larry.

To satisfy the public’s desire to watch the blast, PacifiCorp has set up a live webcast of the breach and will be announcing the URL on their website on Wednesday at 11am.  There’s also a long list of parties to choose from, compiled on the Wet Planet blog.

This request is coming straight from me:  Please do not try to hike in to watch the blast or the rush of water in person.  Selfishly, our cameras are set on timers, and long delays could mean that we miss the blast from some angles.  In addition to Larry and hundreds of other folks who have worked very hard on this, I’ll not be happy.  The entire river corridor will be closed from the dam to the Columbia, so please stay clear!

Our plan for shooting the blast is complex and exciting:

  • Our two long-term time-lapse camera stations (equipped with Canon T2is) will be shooting one JPG frame every 3 seconds all day
  • A second still camera (Canon 1D Mark 4) will be shooting 1 RAW frame per second for 45 minutes starting 5 minutes before the blast
  • Two video cameras–a Sony FS100 and a Sony EX1–will each be shooting HD video for about 8 hours starting at 10am
  • Steve and I will both be mobile with Canon 5Ds

We’ll be the only ones shooting high quality still images of the blast at this tight of a sequence, and we’re excited to see what we get!  All photography is being made possible by intervalometers with an internal real-time clock, allowing us to shoot sequences of images at specific times of the day.  After setup, the cameras will be on their own until the end of the day.

Check back first thing Thursday morning for the first images from the breach.  I’m more excited than anyone to see them, so I’ll be sure to process them quickly and get them out.  If you’re interested in using images, please email me.

Cheers to the White Salmon!

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